From CNN

What We Know About Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine and How It Differs From Pfizer’s

December 17, 2020

Moderna’s coronavirus vaccine candidate is similar to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine that was authorized and shipped out to the first Americans earlier this week.

But there are a few key differences. Most importantly, Moderna’s vaccine can be stored in normal freezers and does not require a super-cold transportation network, making it more accessible for smaller facilities and local communities.

Moderna’s coronavirus vaccine candidate is similar to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine that was authorized and shipped out to the first Americans earlier this week.

But there are a few key differences. Most importantly, Moderna’s vaccine can be stored in normal freezers and does not require a super-cold transportation network, making it more accessible for smaller facilities and local communities.

The US Food and Drug Administration’s vaccine advisory committee meets Thursday to review whether to recommend emergency use authorization for Moderna’s vaccine, with the FDA’s decision expected by Friday.

Here’s a look at what we know about the Moderna vaccine and how it compares to Pfizer’s….

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First Covid-19 Vaccine Trial Moving at a Good Clip, but Officials Still “Very Concerned”

August 19, 2020

The first coronavirus vaccine trial in the US is moving along at a good clip, but needs more minorities to enroll if it is to succeed, officials tell CNN.

While Black people and Latinos account for more than 50% of Covid-19 cases nationwide, so far they make up only about 15% of participants in the nation’s first large-scale clinical trial to test out a coronavirus vaccine, according to data obtained by CNN from a government official.

The first coronavirus vaccine trial in the US is moving along at a good clip, but needs more minorities to enroll if it is to succeed, officials tell CNN.

While Black people and Latinos account for more than 50% of Covid-19 cases nationwide, so far they make up only about 15% of participants in the nation’s first large-scale clinical trial to test out a coronavirus vaccine, according to data obtained by CNN from a government official.

That could potentially delay a vaccine from getting to the marketplace….

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Justice Department Asks for Delay in Obamacare Case Due to Shutdown

January 7, 2019

The Justice Department has asked a federal judge in a case regarding Obamacare for an extension of a filing deadline because of the ongoing partial government shutdown.

While the latest filing is unlikely to delay the case substantively, it represents the latest example of how the shutdown is affecting government operations.

Last week, newly empowered Democrats in the House moved to intervene in an ongoing lawsuit to defend Obamacare, formally known as the Affordable Care Act. A coalition of Democratic state attorneys general is currently defending the law.

The Justice Department has asked a federal judge in a case regarding Obamacare for an extension of a filing deadline because of the ongoing partial government shutdown.

While the latest filing is unlikely to delay the case substantively, it represents the latest example of how the shutdown is affecting government operations.

Last week, newly empowered Democrats in the House moved to intervene in an ongoing lawsuit to defend Obamacare, formally known as the Affordable Care Act. A coalition of Democratic state attorneys general is currently defending the law.

The moves came after federal District Judge Reed O’Connor in Texas issued an opinion last month declaring the landmark health care law’s individual mandate unconstitutional and saying that the rest of the law could not stand. O’Connor, however, said the law would remain in effect pending appeal….

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Kentucky’s sweeping Medicaid work requirement experiment is about to begin

June 28, 2018

Republicans say that Medicaid recipients will become healthier and more financially independent if they work.

Kentucky is about to find out if that’s true.

The Bluegrass State is about to launch a sweeping overhaul of its Medicaid program, taking advantage of new powers granted by the Trump administration that allows states to require many recipients to work or lose their benefits.

Republicans say that Medicaid recipients will become healthier and more financially independent if they work.

Kentucky is about to find out if that’s true.

The Bluegrass State is about to launch a sweeping overhaul of its Medicaid program, taking advantage of new powers granted by the Trump administration that allows states to require many recipients to work or lose their benefits.

“There is dignity associated with earning the value of something you receive,” Governor Matt Bevin said when the initiative was unveiled in January. Kentuckians want “an opportunity not to be put into a dead-end entitlement trap, but rather be put on a path forward and upwards so they can do for themselves.” …

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